star Vaudeville Theatre

404 Strand, London, WC2R 0NH

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Find the best prices for The Ladykillers at the Vaudeville Theatre:

The Ladykillers

The Ladykillers
Limited offer: One grandparent goes free with every full price ticket bought. Please call us and quote ‘Grandparents go free’. This offer is not valid online. Valid for Monday – Friday and Saturday Matinee performances until 17 October 2013. Book by 30 September 2013. Award-winning comedy The Ladykillers returns to London this summer at The Vaudeville Theatre. Gloriously adapted for the stage by Graham Linehan (Father Ted) and directed by Sean Foley (The Play What I Wrote), The Ladykillers is the classic, blackly comic tale of a sweet little old lady, alone in her house, pitted against a gang of criminal misfits who will stop at nothing to pull off their meticulously-planned heist. Featuring a stellar cast of some of the finest stage and screen comedy actors including Simon Day (The Fast Show), Ralf Little (The Royle Family), Olivier Award winners Con O’Neill and John Gordon Sinclair, Chris McCalphy, and Angela Thorne (To The Manor Born) as the sweetly innocent Mrs Wilberforce. Posing as amateur musicians, Professor Marcus and his gang rent rooms in the lopsided house of sweet but strict Mrs Wilberforce. The villains plot her unwitting involvement in Marcus' brilliantly conceived heist job. The police are left stumped but Mrs Wilberforce becomes wise to their ruse and Marcus concludes that there's only one way to keep the old lady quiet. With only her parrot, General Gordon, to help her, Mrs W. is alone with five desperate men. But who will be forced to face the music? more

A lunatic farce. as irresistible as ever, Time Out

Directions

(5mins) Head out onto the main road Strand. Cross street where possible and go right 100 metres – it’s just after the Adelphi Theatre.

Tube

Charing Cross, Covent Garden, Embankment.

Train

Charing Cross, Victoria, Waterloo.

Bus

1, 4 , 6, 9, 11, 13 , 15, 68, 76, 171, 176, 188.

Parking

Upper St Martins Lane NCP, Trafalgar Square Masterpark.

History

Vaudeville Theatre

The Vaudeville Theatre's current building only dates to 1926 but the theatre actually first opened way back on April 16 in 1870. William Wybrow saw a way to turn a profit in theatre and leased the theatre to three actors who opened with a first performance of For Love Or Money and Dos Carlos.The architect was the famous C J Phipps and the decorations came courtesy of George Gordon. The theatre was designed to hold over 1000 patrons but, as the theatre was squeezed behind two houses on the Strand, there wasn't much room and the facilities were somewhat cramped and the entrance was a little hard to find.

Early notable productions include Two Roses starring Henry Irving as Digby Grant in Two Roses. This ran for an unprecedented 300 nights which was really rather extraordinary. The theatre did have a knack for extended runs though with H J Byron's Our Boys going for 500 showings from 1875 and then, later, a massive one thousand.

Thomas Thorne one of the three actors, bought out the whole of the lease in the early 1880s and a few years later he made room for a larger foyer again designed by the same achitect. This also allowed the theatre to be redesigned to make room for more roomy seating and a brand new ceiling. The official reopening was in 1891 with performances of The Note of Hand and Woodbarrow Farm.

However, just a year later, the Gatti family who were the owners of the Adelphi bought out the lease and instantly reprised the famous Our Boys show. The theatre was owned for a short time by Weedon Grossmith but the Gatti family clung on to it and started putting on comic musicals such as The French Maid. Some notable performances around this era include The Catch of the Season, Quality Street, Bluebell in Fairyland, The Cherry Girl and, turn of the century success story, The Belle of Mayfair which ended up running for over 400 performances.

The theatre was completely redesigned during a closure in 1925 and the capacity was rather drastically reduced. The next year the theatre reopened. The Gattis held on to the theatre until 1969 when it was bought by Sir Peter Saunders who ordered another redesign of the interior. Since then there have been a string of different owners including Michael Codron, David Sutton and Stephen Waley-Cohen. More recently Max Weitzenhoffer, sold it to Nimax Theatres Limited in 2005.

Some of the more notable productions include the worldwide hit Stomp, The Importance of Being Earnest, Private Lives and Woman in Mind.

Food and Drink

There are three bars and you can also buy ice cream and confectionery.

Accessibility

Staff will look after guide dogs. The theare is accessible to a wheelchair user able to walk short distances and up a few stairs and half price tickets are available for disabled theatregoers and one companion on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday.

Musicals